What if the wizarding world exists

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Post # 1, written on August 2nd, 2012 | 6:46 pm
The question has occupied me spontaneously today and your opinions would be of great interest to me;)
Actually, there are always incidents where wizards are careless and the Muggle Ministry work together with the Ministry of Magic and try to prevent these errors from being exposed. Or am I completely wrong? : D
It was a while ago about the books, which I have to admit.
In the last Harry Potter part, Voldemort also gains power and the Millennium Bridge, for example, collapses, which is clearly visible to the Muggles. Also the fact that Death Eaters are buzzing around and doing mischief.

From then on, do the Muggles know about the complete existence of the wizarding world?

Thank you for your answer :)
Post # 2, written on August 2nd, 2012 | 6:56 pm
Hi?!

So:

Most muggles are put on a forgetting spell.
And of course the Muggle Minister has been informed and is doing everything possible to cover up such incidents! :))

Well ... we're "muggles" too, aren't we? : D And we know about it!


However, I have to admit that as a 15 year old I still firmly believe that everything that goes wrong must have something to do with magic! : DD

L.g.
Anna
Article # 3, written on August 2nd, 2012 | 9:33 pm
I wonder what is happening to the Muggle ministers. They know about the wizarding world, but will their memories of it be erased?

I also want to know if a muggle could fly on a broomstick too? : D
Article # 4, written on August 2nd, 2012 | 9:41 pm
1. No - when and why? The new minister is always inaugurated shortly after taking office and informed about important events.
It is also up to him whether he continues to tell with the hint that he would then be considered insane.

2. Can a muggle fly on a broomstick? Himself? Probably not, but I think we will definitely be taken along. Why not?
Post # 5, written on August 2nd, 2012 | 11:08 pm
Hi!

Rain dance
From that point on, do the Muggles know about the complete existence of the wizarding world?

No, they certainly explain the destruction of the bridge rationally, with the horizon of a mugger, and not with magic.

I always compare that with aliens and UFOs, who believe in it and talk about it is often dismissed as a weirdo, so that the followers only discuss their theories, experiences and sightings predominantly in their own circles. However, the majority of people think differently and even if they really saw an alien, they would explain the experience with physical or scientific aspects.

And should it really be that no logical / rational explanation for certain causes can be found, then the aliens will have to serve rather than magicians or magic. ;O)

night weariness
2. Can a muggle fly on a broomstick? Himself? Probably not, but I think we will definitely be taken along. Why not?

Why shouldn't a muggle fly alone on a broomstick? The magicians do not need a magic wand or any spell for the broom flight so that the broom rises in the air.

I think that even a Muggle could fly such a magic broom, because it is not the kind of broom that Muggles use for cleaning, even if they look confusingly similar.

greeting

Sayena
Article # 6, written on August 2nd, 2012 | 11:29 pm
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last edited on 08/02/2012 | 11:30 p.m.
Sayena

night weariness
2. Can a muggle fly on a broomstick? Himself? Probably not, but I think we will definitely be taken along. Why not?

Why shouldn't a muggle fly alone on a broomstick? The magicians do not need a magic wand or any spell for the broom flight so that the broom rises in the air.

I think that even a Muggle could fly such a magic broom, because it is not the type of broom that Muggles use to clean, even if they look confusingly similar.


Do you need a wand or not? That would be the question. You definitely need one to Apparate, but you don't have to say a spell. Since you always have a magic wand with you anyway, it remains open whether flying without it or not.
With names like Sauberwisch, I think that originally they were actually perfectly normal brooms and are now only built differently for sports purposes (e.g. our woks can no longer be really cooked with a sports wok)
On the other hand, portkeys are probably common for everyone, as unattractive items are deliberately chosen so that the Muggles don't pick them up.
Post # 7, written on August 2nd, 2012 | 11:42 pm
night weariness
Since you always have a magic wand with you anyway, it remains open whether flying without it or not.

I can only vaguely remember that the players do not carry a wand at Quidditch. But I don't know for sure, I would have to look it up.

Wasn't there a scene, I think about the Dementors, that was explicitly mentioned that Harry took his wand with him for once at a Quidditch game?

And when Harry was little he flew through the house on a broomstick and by then he certainly hadn't had a wand. ;O)
Post # 8, written on August 3rd, 2012 | 12:18 am
Sayena

And when Harry was little he flew through the house on a broomstick and by then he certainly hadn't had a wand. ;O)

Okay, but that was also a "children's broom"
But if you think of the statement that magic mostly shows with about 7, at least children's brooms are magical and don't even need magical riders.
(Great, my head cinema is showing me Fich on a children's broom through Hogwarts XD)

But of course, if the brooms are magical in themselves, Muggles could also fly with them, I just never thought to myself.

I have never paid attention to whether Harry has a magic wand with him for a change. Hm, if that's okay. Was of the opinion that it would only be forbidden to squirm (except possibly in emergencies)
Post # 9, written on August 3rd, 2012 | 10:44 am
Maybe it's the same with the broom as it is with the wands - if a Muggle holds a wand in his hand, nothing happens.
After all, magic is more than just waving a magic wand - anyone can do it. It depends on what is behind it. That certain something, i.e. magical powers, only has a wizard or a witch. So I could imagine that a Muggle could "fly" but not be able to jet around on his own.

LG Severa
Article # 10, written on August 3rd, 2012 | 3:31 pm
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last edited on 08/03/2012 | 3:32 pm
Gato
Maybe it's the same with the broom as with the wands - if a Muggle holds a wand in his hand, nothing happens.

That is not completely right. I mean, it is mentioned in one of the extra volumes (Beedle?) That Muggles who get their hands on a wand can have sudden magical discharges. You can't do magic. Nothing CAN HAPPEN, but what do I know, a bouquet of flowers can also appear ...

As far as the broom flying by Muggles is concerned, nothing is said in QiWdZ, which would be my first source now, but there is a lot about the development and creation.

As for the general knowledge of Muggles, the Ministry of Magic is mainly concerned with covering up, as far as I know, and, according to Potter, we also have a pleasant habit of ascribing things to a general hallucination rather than magic and if not we are easy to control because Nobody believes us and if there is a risk that we should be believed we will get a visitor.
Article # 11, written on August 3rd, 2012 | 6:34 pm
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last edited on 08/03/2012 | 6:44 pm
I don't think Muggles know about the wizarding world, or (apart from a few exceptions) - even suspect that there is - because there is a huge media hype and the wizards would have to look for a new hiding place from the (probable) persecutions , and that would certainly not have gone unmentioned.

Everything about the incidents in Volume 7 is explained anyway: The Millennium Bridge allegedly collapses due to building botch, the devastation in the southwest is caused by hurricanes, etc.

All of the deaths can be dismissed as normal heart attacks, and the people who get it crazy are bogged down. The few exceptions are declared insane.

Because of the flying broom: Since these are items that have been enchanted beforehand, I do believe that Muggles can also use them, especially since the wizard would otherwise have to cast a "flying spell" all the time, which can easily go wrong - although Snape and Voldemort do Being able to fly without aids depends on how complicated such a spell is.
LG
Article # 12, written on August 6, 2012 | 09:31 am
In the books it is said that not only the incumbent Prime Minister knows (albeit very little) about the wizarding world, but also the various Muggle relatives of the wizards, for example Hermione's parents, Dean's mother and Harry's fat Dursley attachment.
Seen in this way, the world of magic is not as big a secret as it is always portrayed.
Article # 13, written on August 6, 2012 | 10:26 am
Hi!

Crazy Kenny
In the books it is said that not only the incumbent Prime Minister knows (albeit very little) about the wizarding world, but also the various Muggle relatives of the wizards, for example Hermione's parents, Dean's mother and Harry's fat Dursley attachment.

Well, that parents know about the magical world is inevitable, after all it would be quite strange if your 11 year old child suddenly disappears for months (at Hogwarts) without the parents being informed. That would probably cause quite a bit of panic and lead to an alarming number of missing persons reports, etc.

However, knowledge of the magical world ends with parents and siblings. Friends of the child (parents) or relatives are not initiated. Exceptions are e.g. the Dursley, because Harry no longer has any parents and his relatives are the legal guardians.

So the magic world is a big secret, I think. ;O)

greeting

Sayena
Article # 14, written on August 6, 2012 | 9:49 pm
Because of the brooms: You don't need wands, because Moody said in Volume 7 that you travel with brooms because you don't have to cast any spells to use them, so they are actually objects that have been enchanted beforehand.
Article # 15, written on August 6, 2012 | 10:15 p.m.
Hi!

Aulomea
As far as the broom flying by Muggles is concerned, nothing is said in QiWdZ, which would be my first source now, but there is a lot about the development and creation.

What is there about development, maybe the answer, whether Muggles can fly alone on a broom, can be constructed from this?

Was the first flying broom, for example, a perfectly normal Muggle broom?

greeting

Sayena
Article # 16, written on 09/01/2012 | 7.45 p.m.
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last edited on 09/01/2012 | 7:46 pm
Hi!

Again to the broom "problem". I have now stumbled across a passage in the 5th book that can be interpreted as an indication of how the flying broom works.

Quote: "What is this Weasley flying?" Malfoy cried scornfully. "Why would someone cast a flying spell on such a moldy old block of wood?"

According to this, flying brooms are covered with a flying magic beforehand (presumably by the broom manufacturer) so that they are suitable for flying. So even a Muggle could fly on it alone.

greeting

Sayena
Article # 17, written on September 1st, 2012 | 8:23 pm
Sayena

Quote: "What is this Weasley flying?" Malfoy cried scornfully. "Why would someone cast a flying spell on such a moldy old block of wood?"

According to this, flying brooms are covered beforehand (presumably by the broom manufacturer) with a flying magic so that they are suitable for flying. So even a Muggle could fly on it alone.

greeting

Sayena


Hi!

Do you mean I think more that it has to be someone with a magical system to be able to activate the magic of the broom at all.

LG
Article # 18, written on 09/01/2012 | 8:32 pm
Ignifer
Do you mean I think more that it has to be someone with a magical system to be able to activate the magic of the broom at all.

Yes, I mean, because a portkey, for example, can also be used by Muggles.

So as long as magic has to be applied to an object, I think it doesn't need a magical person to activate it.
Article # 19, written on September 1st, 2012 | 9:04 pm
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last edited on 09/01/2012 | 9:05 pm
Sayena
Hi!

Crazy Kenny
In the books it is said that not only the incumbent Prime Minister knows (albeit very little) about the wizarding world, but also the various Muggle relatives of the wizards, for example Hermione's parents, Dean's mother and Harry's fat Dursley attachment.

Well, that parents know about the magical world is inevitable, after all it would be quite strange if your 11 year old child suddenly disappears for months (at Hogwarts) without the parents being informed. That would probably cause quite a bit of panic and lead to an alarming number of missing persons reports, etc.

However, knowledge of the magical world ends with parents and siblings. Friends of the child (parents) or relatives are not initiated. Exceptions are e.g. the Dursley, because Harry no longer has any parents and his relatives are the legal guardians.

So the magic world is a big secret, I think. ;O)

greeting

Sayena


It all depends on how many wizards come from Muggle families.
Voldemort and his family lament the increasing tendency of the "mixing between wizards and muggles".
So you have to take into account that wizards who marry Muggles will usually initiate their life partners.
Article # 20, written on September 1st, 2012 | 9:16 pm
But even the Muggle-friendly wizards are against revealing themselves to the Muggles.

Somehow I don't even know how logical I think that is.
Close members of the Muggle-born family know about it and considering that there are hardly any "real" Purebloods left there must be a hell of a lot. So in the end, the more the magical world grows, the more knowledgeable Muggles there are who live side by side and just don't say anything because they are afraid of being considered crazy.

And well, that's where I find it sad that witches and wizards are apparently only allowed to tell their future spouses after the wedding (see Pottermore McGonnagal's parents and also Minerva herself, who talked about her fiancé out of fear that it might turn out the same way has separated)
Article # 21, written on September 1st, 2012 | 10:01 pm
Sayena
Ignifer
Do you mean I think more that it has to be someone with a magical system to activate the magic of the broom at all.

Yes, I mean, because a portkey, for example, can also be used by Muggles.

So as long as magic has to be applied to an object, I think it doesn't need a magical person to activate it.


You're right somewhere. But the ports are about something that doesn't really have to be controlled, but only has the effect of a transport from A to B, which is specified in the key. A broom, on the other hand, has to be finely controlled and that requires a minimum of magic for me. Or how do you see that?
Article # 22, written on September 1st, 2012 | 10:28 p.m.
Hm Hermione can't do it properly either, although she is talented. This can also depend on the human broom feeling or perhaps on the sense of balance.
There are also the children's brooms, one of which Harry got for his 1st birthday. The talent for magic shows up mostly with about 7.
Can't really imagine that you can use Kinderesen as a kind of Squib early detection.
Article # 23, written on September 1st, 2012 | 10:40 p.m.
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last edited on 09/01/2012 | 10:41 pm
@Ignifer

I see it in such a way that the magic (i.e. the magic of flying) only helps the broom to lift off the ground ... so it can fly, the person who sits on the broom with his body takes over the control (shifting weight, tilting, etc.). Like steering a snowboard, for example, or body flying.
Post # 24, written on 02.09.2012 | 11:21 am
@Syena and @nachtdrude

Hm, you could be right there.
But what surprises me then is the first lesson from Madame Hooch, where she lets the students call the brooms with an "up". You could have saved yourself that completely if you just sit on it and can only control everything with your (Muggle) body.

Squib early detection? 😁 The idea would never have occurred to me.
Article # 25, written on 02.09.2012 | 6:03 pm
Ignifer
@Syena and @nachtdrude

Hm, you could be right there.
But what surprises me then is the first lesson from Madame Hooch, where she lets the students call the brooms with an "up". You could have saved yourself that completely if you just sit on it and can only control everything with your (Muggle) body.

Squib early detection? 😁
The idea would never have occurred to me.

In the first book, not all the details of Rowling's magical world are fully determined.
In the early books, for example, "werewolf boys" and "werewolves in the forbidden forest" are spoken of as if they were animals. In the third volume it was stated that werewolves are people with some kind of disease.

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