What kind of students hate teachers

Is the rector being blasphemed in the staff room? How do teachers talk to each other about students? And what do you think of your parents? Airs from this week SZ.de These and other school secrets with the help of a woman who should know: Catrin Kurtz teaches German and Protestant religion at a secondary school in Bavaria. She is in her early 30s, married and enjoys going to the gym in her free time. In truth, Catrin Kurtz has a different name. She writes here anonymously, for her own protection and for the protection of the people her posts are about. Otherwise, plain language is spoken in the teacher blog - in the first episode, the question: Do teachers also dread the first day of school?

"I don't want to go to school, I really don't want to!" "But you have to, you are the teacher!" Who doesn't know this joke? In fact, it hits exactly where I was feeling on a September morning, almost exactly a year ago. After six weeks of summer vacation, the first day of school was due - and I had found out the afternoon before that I would be a class teacher in a ninth grade.

A ninth grade, and then this class, notorious and feared in the college. How much much I would rather have received a sweet, sweet fifth grade, as it was actually promised me! Instead, scratchy teenagers in the middle of puberty - and then also from the artistic train. The secondary school teacher’s favorite branch, experience has shown that they are all individualists. But what use was all the inner wailing and wheezing, as a teacher you have to attend school and so I was in the classroom on time for the gong and waited for things.

Five minutes after the gong, the first students kindly arrived. Huge students, way too tall and grown up for ninth graders in my opinion. Brightly made-up girls with tiny handbags and lanky boys without any kind of bag. Presence alone was obviously enough of the honor to claim too much school supplies on the first day of school.

Mini handbag, maxi problems

After the students had discussed their vacation experiences extensively, there was a phase of general indignation (because I insolently demanded silence and attention) - before I could start organizational matters at an advanced stage. Agenda item one: Issuing school books. The fact that they actually existed on the first day of school caused great uproar again. "Where should I put the books, they won't fit in my handbag!"

Oh really? After eight years of school, four of them at secondary school, where books were always available on the first day of school, the students were seriously overwhelmed. School books were stuffed into miniature handbags, plastic bags were organized in a panic, or the dear parents were summoned to the book chauffeur service.

After four school hours and various frictions (points of view had to be made clear, on both sides) there was still some time left. As a good German teacher, I used this - from my point of view: sensibly, from the student's point of view: sadistically - for a dictation. Imagine that, a dictation, on the first day of school, cheek! And anyway, how can you take notes on a dictation without pens and pads?

But forward-looking teachers have a pen box with them for such cases and there are usually enough sheets of paper at every school. So there were no excuses. I was at least the least popular teacher in the school that day.

Weeks later, we had slowly gotten used to each other, and somehow we even liked each other a little, the girls in the class told me on a school trip in confidence: "You know, teacher, on the first day of school, we could have puked. You were so mean, we hated you, we could have puked so much. "

You know what? Me too.

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