Are 60 40 soldering steam dangerous

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Which type of respiratory protection filter is suitable for soldering fumes?

    










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For soldering, there are solder fume extractors that suck the solder fumes away from the user or at least try to do so.

However, I have a real half mask from the manufacturer 3M and, in contrast to the soldering fume extractor, it offers proper protection, because with a respirator, provided the filter is suitable, it is impossible that the vapor can get into the lungs.
In the case of soldering fume extractors, at best one can only speak of sucking away the fumes, there is in fact no guarantee that one will still not inhale fumes during soldering work. Therefore, in my opinion, the protection provided by a half mask should be better.

And since I already have the half mask, it would make sense for me to use it. I could then save the money for a soldering fume extractor.


However, there are different types and classes of respiratory protection filters.
See also:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atemschutzfilter#Kennzeichnung


Usually, the equipment used indicates which protective filter is required.
If, for example, you paint something with paint when painting, then the paint can says the necessary respiratory protection filter class, which is necessary when painting with this paint.

However, there is no such information on soldering materials and fluxes, which is why it is difficult to select the right type of filter for the respirator.


So I would like to know if any of you have already had experience with it, used a respirator for soldering and could tell me which type of respiratory filter protection you are using?

In this product catalog there are e.g. descriptions of the various filter types against which gases they are suitable. Does anyone know what gases are released when soldering and using fluxes?
If so, then you could choose the right filter accordingly.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&.....d=rja








[This message was modified by: Newbie on Mar 31, 2011 14:43]

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So, I asked the manufacturer 3M.

The answer was that the right filter cartridge depends on the flux used.
As a rough guide, however, a filter insert was recommended that includes protection class types ABP3.
So against organic gases and vapors with a boiling point> 65 ° C (A), as well as inorganic gases and vapors (B), as well as against particles (P3).

For my half mask respirator that would be a combination of the filter types with the article designation 6057 for the gases and vapors, then 5935 for solid and liquid particles and 501 as a holder.













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I've already done it, but only because I soldered for hours without fresh air.
Otherwise, I think that's a bit silly.

It is important that fresh air is supplied and that the vapors are not inhaled directly. This is what these deductions are for and they also work if you place them sensibly.

P.S .: without a draft, your eyes will hurt at some point. This is where the flux residues from the steam also settle.


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I'll just open the window or solder on the balcony.
But I'll still use the respirator because the wind doesn't always blow and I'm not particularly impressed by the suction device.
I guess that it doesn't work much better than an extractor hood when cooking, you always smell somehow.


In addition, I can use a 120 mm PC fan, which can then at least suck away vapors.
In principle, I could also buy such activated carbon filters from Reichelt and attach them behind the PC fan, which should have the same effect as such a suction device. Then the vapors are not only sucked away, but also immediately bound in the activated carbon filter.


Regarding That doesn't bother me stupidly, I think respiratory masks and the like are actually cool.


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http://cgi.ebay.de/Neue-NVA-Gasmask.....d0295

At least helped against the lovely smell of a clogged toilet sewer pipe full of Sch ....
I originally bought mine for a joke, never used the filter. In 1992 they were also available for 1DM in the remaining stock shop. Apparently the filters still work reasonably after 30 years.

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Newbie, how often and how long do you solder every day?

DL2JAS

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Quote :
dl2jas wrote on 31 Mar 2011 21:07:

Newbie, how often and how long do you solder every day?

DL2JAS



Actually, I rarely solder, but I find the smell, or rather, that subsequent scratching in the throat, nevertheless, extremely unpleasant.

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I solder in my garage and if there is more I put a small 12V fan from the PC next to the workpiece, which then blows away the soldering fumes.

I find soldering with respiratory protection a bit exaggerated. Otherwise you will absorb enough poison from the environment. The few fumes no longer matter. Maybe a smoker?

Or do you solder in an airtight room?

mfg francy

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Offtopic:
I would find it much more uncomfortable if someone laughed at me for being wimpy while soldering ...

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At what temperature do you solder and which solder do you use?

I use a soldering station with 350 ° C and the usual Sn60Pb40 lead solder with a flux core made of rosin. There is not really any smoke during the soldering process itself. If the soldering iron is in the holder for a long time, the rosin residue on the tip slowly fumes up.
Are you a militant non-smoker?
I myself am a smoker and am not averse to good pipe tobacco. I haven't been able to complain about odor nuisance from rosin, incidentally, rosin is a natural tree resin, conifers. If you can't stand the smell, I advise against sitting in front of an open fireplace in which conifers are being burned.

DL2JAS

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Quote :
francydt wrote on 31 Mar 2011 21:23:

I find soldering with respiratory protection a bit exaggerated. Otherwise you will absorb enough poison from the environment. The few fumes no longer matter. Maybe a smoker?

No, I am a non-smoker. Always been.



Quote :
Or do you solder in an airtight room?

mfg francy

Well, in winter I had to solder something quickly and it was a bit stupid on the balcony with the minus temperatures, because the soldering iron did not get really hot or the soldering point was cooled very well by the freezing wind.
I didn't mind that myself, I'm tough and not a coward, but it was suboptimal for the soldering point.


dl2jas wrote on Mar 31, 2011 10:16 PM:

At what temperature do you solder and which solder do you use?

My soldering iron is unfortunately not adjustable and still from my father's time. The soldering iron should have been around for 40 years and then it wasn't a special soldering iron, but a Wald & Wiesen soldering iron from the hardware store with a thick power cable up to the soldering iron.






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I now hijack the thread briefly:
These cheap soldering fume extractors with filter mats only do something against flux fumes, if at all, but don't get the lead out of the steam - do they?
How much lead gets into the air when soldering Sn60Pb38Cu2?
At my AG, some leaded soldering is still used in areas where it is still allowed.

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Quote :
: andi: wrote on Apr 1, 2011 8:26 am:

How much lead gets into the air when soldering Sn60Pb38Cu2?
At my AG, some leaded soldering is still used in areas where it is still allowed.



I once read somewhere that lead hardly or not at all gets into the air when soldering. I can be wrong, however.

I can imagine it as follows.
The lead has a boiling point of 1749 ° C and, at the relatively low temperatures for lead when soldering, lead atoms cross-link with the remaining liquid lead rather than volatilize.

When soldering, the flux is more of a problem:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flussm.....nzial


[This message was modified by: Newbie on Apr 1, 2011 12:21 PM]

[This message was modified by: Newbie on Apr 1, 2011 12:22 PM]

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Better to invest in a usable soldering station!

You will notice that you can solder much better with it than with a simple soldering iron, which may get faintly red-hot when it is not used. There is a lot of smoke when the tip nibbles on the rosin at a high temperature. Better to avoid smoke and solder well.
Weller builds good soldering stations, a used one will probably be enough. ERSA also has some very good soldering stations. Spare parts are still available from both manufacturers after many years.

DL2JAS

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I would have needed a respirator today. I melted and alloyed 180kg lead. The lead wasn't that bad, but the dirt and glue from the balancing weights.

That’s the end of fun. The way the fumes stank are extremely toxic.

When the lead is melted again next week it will be a breeze because all the dirt is gone. You can do that in the garage too.

mfg francy