What color is pure light

Colours

Newton came to many important findings about white light and its spectral colors with simple experiments, which you will find described in more detail here.

Decomposition of white light into the spectral colors

If you let white light fall on a prism in a suitable way, you can observe on a screen behind it that the white light has been broken down into different colors. An area can be seen on the screen that is colored red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo or purple. These colors are called the Spectral colors.

You can also find the spectral colors in a rainbow. Here the sun is the source of white light and the raindrops are responsible for the decomposition.

Indecomposability of the spectral colors

If you now let any spectral color fall through a prism again, you will see on the screen that the color of the light has not changed again. Spectral colors cannot be broken down further. They are also called pure colors.

Invisible radiation in the spectrum

In addition to the spectral colors, sunlight, for example, contains other components that you cannot see with the naked eye - even if you split sunlight into its spectral colors using a prism.

A stake is infrared radiation (IR radiation). This radiation would be on the screen in the experiment (cf. Fig. 1) can be seen above the red light. Infrared radiation is used, for example, in heat lamps.

Another invisible part is called ultraviolet radiation (UV radiation) designated. This radiation would be on the screen in the experiment (cf. Fig. 1) can be seen below the blue light. Ultraviolet radiation is used, for example, to check banknotes and harden nail polish. Some of the UV radiation is also responsible for sunburn.