Chocolate is bad for dogs

Chocolate; a danger to dogs and cats ?!

While many people love to eat chocolate for a lifetime, it is dangerous for pets! Because it contains two substances that are poisonous for dogs and that cats do not tolerate well either. Read here what makes chocolate so dangerous, what the symptoms of chocolate poisoning look like and what you should do if your four-legged friend has eaten a piece of chocolate.

Is chocolate toxic to my dog?

At the end of the year there is usually more chocolate in the house than in the rest of the year and this is where the danger lurks! Chocolate is toxic to dogs and cats. Chocolate poisoning often occurs in dogs because they have more of a tendency to eat everything off the table and also do not stop at eating chocolate and its packaging. Chocolate contains theobromine. The theobromine content varies depending on the type of chocolate. But in general: the darker the chocolate, the more theobromine it contains.

Why do dogs get sick because of it and humans don't?

People can process this substance without any problems. Dogs just not; With them it takes much longer until theobromine is broken down from their organism and therefore the concentration of this substance can accumulate. Whether or not your dog will get sick from this will depend on their weight, the type, and the amount of chocolate they have eaten. In addition, one animal is more sensitive to theobromine than the other and therefore the symptoms of poisoning are different.

Is chocolate toxic to cats too?

Theobromine is also toxic to cats. However, cats are far more picky about what they eat than dogs, and this is why most of them are not that interested in chocolate. Especially kittens are more at risk here.

Symptoms

To make it clearer; a dog weighing 5 kg can already show slight symptoms of poisoning if it has only eaten 16 g dark chocolate or 50 g milk chocolate. The different types of chocolate all contain their own concentration of theobromine. The first symptoms of chocolate poisoning usually appear 4 to 12 hours after the chocolate has been eaten, and in rare cases symptoms only appear after 24 hours. Your pet may become restless, pant or drink a lot, vomit or have diarrhea and even muscle twitching. Some animals can also have an epileptic seizure. Serious poisoning can lead to cardiac arrhythmias or your animal may fall into a coma.

What do you have to pay attention to?

As soon as your dog or cat has eaten chocolate, it is particularly important to act quickly. Do not hesitate and get in touch with your veterinarian. Keep the packaging of the chocolate, the information about the content of theobromine (cocoa content) is particularly important. And try to estimate how much chocolate your dog or cat has eaten. It is also important to estimate when your pet might have eaten the chocolate. This information is important so that the veterinarian can provide the best possible assessment of the emergency. Admission to a veterinary clinic may be necessary.

Of course, occurrence is always better than cure - so never leave chocolate lying around in the house if possible.