Are beautiful people actually healthier?

Psychology: Beautiful people have a clear advantage

16-year-old Lena stands in the locker room and curses: "What a bummer, the dress looks awful and it pinches. Did I gain weight like that?" Lena draws the curtains, sits down and feels ugly. Actually, she wanted to go to a party in the evening with the new dress, but now the anticipation is gone. The dress stays in the store.

Every second girl between the ages of 15 and 17 finds herself "too fat", according to the Federal Center for Health Education. Every fourth person has already thought about plastic surgery.

But it is not only among teenagers that dissatisfaction with their own bodies is growing, writes the psychologist Ursula Nuber in her new book "The 11th Commandment - Mastering Life with Serenity". In her opinion, the devastating view is consolidating in society that a body that is considered beautiful is essential for a happy life.

In her book, Nuber makes a plea for a more relaxed approach to the phenomenon. The aim should be to feel comfortable in one's body.

However, numerous studies show that beautiful people actually have many advantages in life. The American psychologist Rita Freedmann, who specializes in "attractiveness research", has discovered that it begins immediately after birth. Mothers responded more strongly and more often to their babies when they are pretty. They caressed and kissed her more often.

In short: pretty babies receive more attention, which increases their well-being. It is noteworthy that even babies prefer to look at pretty faces rather than ugly ones. Regardless of the mother's appearance, infants - regardless of whether they are of European, Afro-American or Latin American origin - look longer at more attractive faces.

Beauty is not just in the eye of the beholder

"The results are clear," confirms the psychologist Martin Gründl from the University of Regensburg. There is a high degree of social consensus as to which body type and which faces are perceived as beautiful.

His research revealed that the main criteria of attractiveness for female figures were long legs, at least medium-sized breasts and a narrow waist, "but proportions are also important". Full lips, large eyes, a delicate nose and a high forehead are important characteristics of a "beautiful, feminine face," says Gründl.

As a rule, people automatically infer internal personality traits from external attributes, as experiments have shown. "These misjudgments happen unconsciously," says the psychologist.

Attractive people benefit from prejudice

Beautiful people benefit from positive prejudices: At first they are thought to be more socially competent, more successful, more intelligent, more personable, more self-confident, more creative, more sociable, more hardworking, more satisfied and more passionate.