Which country produces strong female chess players?

Why do so many top chess players come from Russia?

  • ~~ New-Chessgamer ~~ 03/04/2009, 3:05 pm
    Quote by problem is
    There were 15 Soviet republics.
    You forgot the Baltic States (Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia) and Moldova.
    Oh oh, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia are not CIS states ... That's why.

    And please stop discussing nonsensical things here, (Piky you misunderstood me, as Kiffing said.)
    Things that are no longer related to the topic are spam and that's stupid ... I will report more spam ...

    It was once written here that the first thing to do is teach the children (and learners) the endgame, is that correct?
    I have learned the game of chess with an opening, does the endgame (if you look at it correctly at the beginning ...) have better successes than the middle game and opening? Maybe the Russian children learn better and more effectively, maybe even faster ... But is that really true?
  • Maybe there wasn't much more besides drinking vodka than playing chess. After all, Russia is not exactly known for the exuberant wealth of its citizens.

  • Well, then every developing country would have to produce good chess players. I think the whole thing has just cultural reasons. And scahchsport was professionally raised in the USSR.

  • It's no secret that chess was seen by the Bolsheviks as a way of demonstrating "intellectual superiority" of the working class, so the sport has been promoted to the best of our ability since the 1920s. It started to bear fruit in the 1930s. Even if the huge number of top players may no longer exist due to the lack of support from the state, there are still many high-class players and coaches who can pass on their knowledge and many clubs where that happens. The basis of the old supremacy is still there, even if it is slowly eroding.

    When "New Chessgamer" looks at the lists of participants in the candidate tournaments after the Second World War and pays attention to the players from the old USSR, he will notice that their dominance was even more pronounced back then.

  • Antikraut 04.03.2009, 16:20

    Well, now I'm wondering if Piky just wants to troll ...
    @Summer: Why only 5 languages ​​and cultures? In today's Germany there is also more than one. And over 700 in Papua New Guinea alone

    @New Chessgamer: As for the World Cup, Tal was Latvian, Petrosyan Armenian and Kasparov was a native of Azeri. All citizens of the Soviet Union, of course.
    Another point is that the system has given its top players pretty much every imaginable support. Spasski 1972 and later Karpov were supported by almost the entire Soviet grandmasters' squad - and there were quite a few. Of course, that shouldn't reduce people's individual performance, but things are tight at the top of the world, so something like that can make all the difference.

    Oh, and there are also expropriations and evictions for construction projects outside of China. For example, 10 kilometers from my front door in the lignite mining area.

    @sueno: Although you have to note that e.g. Keres started his career outside the USSR, Estonia was independent before the war.

  • Quote by Summer power
    Because you can either just drink vodka or play chess there.
    Yes, summer power, either we don't have the same sense of humor or something is not going well with you in the upstairs room!
  • Widukind March 5th, 2009, 9:24 am

    The Soviet chess promotion was ramped up again after Spasski's defeat by Fischer in 1972 because they did not want to be offered the disgrace.

  • trobert550 March 5, 2009, 5:16 pm
    Quote by Summer power
    Because you can either just drink vodka or play chess there.
    Are you a moderator?
    I lived in St. Petersburg for 6 years.
    I haven't seen anyone who drinks (vodka), but
    I didn't see anyone playing chess either ...........



    Kind regards
  • SommerPower March 5, 2009, 5:26 pm
    Quote by Witcher
    Yes, summer power, either we don't have the same sense of humor or something is not going well with you in the upstairs room!
    Quote by trobert55
    I admit, at such a level I can barely keep up with the article I quoted. But you could at least see mine cynically.
  • ~~ New-Chessgamer ~~ 05.03.2009, 18:21

    And now it's spam again ...

    Personally, I don't believe in prejudices about other people at all, after all, Germans are said to be pretty fat and drink beer all day, which is not true either. (well with some ... )
    Therefore it is actually an insult to other peoples to say anything about them ...

    But that doesn't matter now, please no more spam ...

    Why didn't it come about in other countries that chess has become a sport that you can live off of, here in Germany, for example, chess has a pretty boring reputation, who are good chess players, they'd rather pay attention to good soccer / handball players etc thrown. I'm sure that in Russia not so many people would say on the street: "Chess ?! How boring ...", right?

  • Hello,

    I would like to revive the original question slightly changed, because I have been confronted with it twice in the last few weeks.

    Once I was asked the question: why is almost every Russian able to play chess today?
    I have never dealt with the question and could only speculate:
    i suspect that it was very important to the parties of the cold war to be considered "more intellectual than the other". the game of chess was just too perfect to "prove" this. This is the reason why the Spasski - Fischer duels were so "important" at the time. similar to the race around space. you wanted to show your opponent that you could do more. therefore a lot was promoted and disseminated.

    But that's just a guess on my part, which I just sucked out of my fingers from a standing start.

    Strangely enough, a few days later I was asked the same thing by someone else, who then also gave a different explanation:
    In a sense, the Russians are said to have been so badly in the past that the government distributed chessboards so that people could distract themselves with the game. so the game of chess was then spread across the country.

    well, how was it now?
    where are the origins of the spread of the game of chess in russia?

    greeting
    Dopp

  • McMiller 09/10/2012, 10:23 am

    Neither are there so many bad ones anywhere. The base is broad.

  • The slightly modified question I asked here is not "why are there so many quality ... "but just" why is there so lots ..."?

    for that there has to be a development and reasons.
    simply saying "this is a national sport" is not enough.
    that would be the case if you asked "why is water (at room temperature) liquid?" answers with "because it is its state of aggregation" (= "because it is liquid").

    greeting
    Dopp

  • Opportunity slip10.09.2012, 11:44

    Chess has been very much promoted and propagated by the state in the Soviet Union since Lenin.
    Omnipresent in the media and offered at least as an optional subject in many schools.
    This is how you get a broad base. And once it is established, it can last for a long time.

    Football was being propagated in Germany at the same time.
    And what do we have today? Every Kuhkaff has a football club with a youth department and practically no pig plays rugby or field handball or other games that were once just as popular here.

  • McMiller 09/10/2012, 11:49 am

    I was referring to the "top player".
    Incidentally, here in D I keep meeting Russians, including academics, who don't know how to move the pieces. They just grin and think that everyone thinks, ALL Russians are chess players ...

  • Quote by Dopp
    my slightly modified question asked here is not "why are there so many quality ... "but just" why is there so lots ..."?

    for that there has to be a development and reasons.
    simply saying "this is a national sport" is not enough.
    that would be the case if you asked "why is water (at room temperature) liquid?" answers with "because it is its state of aggregation" (= "because it is liquid").

    greeting
    Dopp
    The article on the Russian chess school in Wiki gives a little bit of information (not much more than you can already read here). But you might have already read it. I think it's nice to note that they wanted to define a "dialectical" Soviet style of play. Probably according to the witty motto: move from white = thesis, move from black = antithesis, next move from white = synthesis ...
  • Yes, good old Russia, after all, promoted chess well. However, it is even more extreme, in Japan they even set up a ministry for the Go game in the Tokugawa era. It's all a question of funding.

  • Quote by ~~ New-Chessgamer ~~
    Why do so many top chess players come from Russia? (former Soviet Union, USSR)

    Do you know that maybe? I think there are so many chess greats from Russia, more than from other countries, right? Why is that?

    Isn't that important either, I'm just interested

    bye, chessgamer
    Well, the chess tradition in Russia is more pronounced than it is here, and it is encouraged more in schools. Most Russians can probably play chess, the proportion should be higher than ours, then the not insignificant population of Russia is added to the equation.

    Of course, both India and China have more people, there are certainly very strong players there (probably everyone knows Anand), but it is not as widespread among the population there as in Russia, especially since there are many other games there too (which in turn are little known in Russia and Europe).

    In China there is Xiangqi, and in Japan there is Shogi (and especially Japan, which has excellent Shogi players, hardly has strong players in Western chess).
    What we are currently seeing in top chess (numerous draws) does not even exist in the Shogi. There is practically no draw there (apart from very rare exceptions).

    It is also interesting that a country like Iceland has a very high proportion of strong players compared to the total population. When it is cold and dark in winter, playing chess is probably a good idea ...
    (and in Russia there is sometimes also the fact that more expensive leisure activities are not included ...)

    My grandfather was once in Russian captivity, he said that at that time the chess pieces were carved out of pieces of wood that were lying around.

    Olli