Death is life and life is death

The poet Richard O. MooreLife is life - death is death

How can the work of Richard O. Moore be described? What distinguishes his poetic legacy? And what did he experience as a contemporary witness of the literary movement of the San Francisco Renaissance in the 1940s? A feature on the life's work of the poet who died in 2015.

The poet Richard O. Moore at a Seniors for Peace demonstration (Martina Groß)

When Richard O. Moore's first volume of poetry, "Writing the Silences", was published in 2010, he had just celebrated his 90th birthday. In the same year, the author met him for the first time: He was a contemporary witness of the literary movement of the San Francisco Renaissance in the 1940s. "I'll be the last," said Richard O. Moore, astonished.

Martina Groß visited him again and again. It documents his regression, he used to say. He read her poems he was writing, talked about anarchism, pacifism and the break-in of Ginsberg & Co. in the San Francisco Bay and the consequences. Even when he went almost completely blind in 2013, he remained what he always was: Curious about new experiences, including the last one: dying.

Until the day of his death, March 25, 2015, he worked with the poet collective, consisting of his six children and a few young West Coast poets.

A feature on the life's work of the poet who died in 2015.

Production: SWR / Dlf 2017

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Life is life. Death is death. The poet Richard O. Moore (PDF)

Life is life. Death is death. The poet Richard O. Moore (text version)